Therefore all seasons shall be sweet to thee,
Whether summer clothe the general earth
With greeness, or the redbreast sit and sing
Betwixt the tufts of snow on the bare branch
Of mossy apple-tree, while the nigh thatch
Smokes in the sun-thaw; whether the eave-drops fall
Heard only in the trances of the blast,
Or if the secret ministry of frost
Shall hang them up in silent icicles,
Quietly shining to the quiet Moon.



Monday, April 20, 2009

Back to the Iron Age



My elder son and daughter-in-law came for lunch yesterday along with the two girls and in the afternoon we went out into Derbyshire and walked up Higger Tor and across to Carl Wark. The photo above shows Higger Tor in the foreground and Carl Wark behind it.



Kaitlyn leading the way up to Higger Tor.



This part of the Peak District is gritstone country and some of the rock formations are pretty impressive. Gritstone was used to make millstones for grinding flour and also grindstones for sharpening the blades of the knives and other edge tools that were made in Sheffield. The Little Mesters were famous all over the world for the fine quality of their cutlery.



Carl Wark is an ancient hillfort built on a natural escarpment and fortified on the remaining side by a wall built of large gritstone blocks. It is thought to be Iron Age but this has never actually been proved.



More of the huge gritstone boulders on top of Higger Tor with the track to Carl Wark disappearing into the distance.



Only three of us scrambled down the rocks and walked over to Carl Wark, Hannah and Lucy found a nice sheltered spot in the sun and waited for us. As usual the intrepid explorere is leading the way! If you click on the photo you will see the gritstone wall of the fort quite clearly, it's still extremely substantial even though it's around 2000 years old.



Standing on top of Carl Wark and looking across the moor to Stanage Edge which is a mecca for rock climbers, there are 800 recorded climbs of all grades and climbers come from all over Britain to climb here. Clicking on the photo will make the Edge a bit clearer.


A triumphant return to Higger Tor to collect mummy and Lucy then it's home for tea after a very exciting and satisfactory afternoon.

22 comments:

Diane said...

Hi Rowan, This is one of our favorite walks - the scenery is so spectacular. I didnt know that it was an ancient hill fort though. You keep educating me! Thanks.

Wanda said...

When reading your posts...I am always so aware how young the United States is...Your country and all the rich heritage is so pleasing to read about...and such interesting facts and names...'Higger Tor'...I've read history books and seen many movies of course...but it just seems more relevant reading of your country here.

Rosie said...

What a wonderful walk your intrepid explorer took you on! I'd heard of Stannage Edge but not Higger Tor or Carl Wark - thanks for all the interesting information about it. It looks like a walk we would enjoy taking one day:)

Thimbleanna said...

Ok Rowan, I want to live with you! You have the most wonderful adventures. The variety of landscape in the UK will never cease to amaze me. This looks like a great walk and your little leader is adorable!

Roy said...

That's a rugged looking place up there Rowan.

Cathy said...

It's very beautiful there in it's own way. It would be a lovely walk to take especially if you know all the area's history too. Thank you for the lovely story.

Piecefulafternoon said...

Lovely walk - I think we should have a cup of tea after the walk.

Hollace said...

Who owns the land? Is it government, privately held, or a national park? Very beautiful, and of course we wonder how stones that size were maneuvered into place.

Rowan said...

Hollace, all this area is part of the Peak District National Park, it's a wonderful area full of interesting and beautiful places. I've done one or two other posts in the past about walks I've done if you want to see more of it.

Ariad said...

What an awe inspiring place.

Sheila said...

Kaitlyn is such a good little walker. It's so nice to see children out and enjoying the fresh air. What a wonderful landscape. It is a part of Britain I have never been to. When I was Kaitlyn's age I used to walk for miles with my grandmother across the Malvern hills. I think it gives you a love of nature that stays with you all your life.

Derrick said...

Hello Rowan,

Your photos are wonderful full size! You have to hand it to the people of old, existing in these wild places - very inhospitable! Glad you had such a bright day for it.

Patty said...

Hi Rowan, How I envy you to be able to walk such places, such ancient places. You must feel the echos of time there.

FireLight said...

What a fabulous hike! I agree with Derrick. It is hard to imagine how people survived, and yet it is beautiful to the eye.

PAT said...

J and I enjoyed the walk, Rowan! Wonderful post and photos!

Melanie said...

Beutiful Views.

http://melaniegalloway.info/

thelma said...

Hi Rowan,
See you got smitten by the Iron Age hillforts ;) it looks lovely up your part of the country, the weather has been incredible the last few days.
Thelma

Re said...

What spectacular scenery.

dowhatyoulove said...

Wow, that really looks like a magical place. Those stones are amazing. Millstones have always facinated me. Great to see where some of them come from.

Looks like you had a lovely outing with your family!

uphilldowndale said...

My sort of landscape!

Bovey Belle said...

What a fabulous walk and little Kaitlyn is quite intrepid! Tam has been saying about exploring once her dissertation is finished so I s hall point her in this direction. Loved the hillfort - we have a vitrified hillfort t'other side of Llandeilo called Garn Goch which is similar to your one.

Julie said...

It must be just phenomenal to live in England and go out your front door for a jaunt and come across such interesting historical things. I'm jealous,,,